Sharon Elliot sold a story about celebrity Max Clifford
Sharon Elliot sold a story about celebrity Max Clifford

Celebrity stories and scandals are worth a lot of money to the UK tabloid newspapers – it’s hardly surprising when we’re all guilty of loving a bit of celeb gossip! But if you’ve got a story to sell about a celebrity, you want to make sure you get the best deal. That’s where we come in… give us a call on 0117 9076934 or fill in the form on the right.

 

How do I know I’ll get paid?

Understandably, you might be anxious about sending your exclusive pictures, documents, or video clips straight to a national newspaper, with no guarantee you’ll get paid. We act as the middleman for the sale – negotiating the sale on your behalf, and protecting the value of your story. We can provide you with a signed guarantee that your tip-off won’t be published until you’ve got a deal on the table that you’re happy with. And, even better, we can use our top-level press contacts to ensure you get the best price for your story too.

 

Do I have to have my name in the story too?

To be honest, this depends on the type of story you’re trying to sell. If you’ve snapped a photo of a celebrity doing something naughty, or captured video footage of a famous face up to something interesting, there’s no real reason why you’d have to be identified as the source. You could just provide the tip-off, and leave it to the professionals to work their magic. If you’ve got concerns about protecting your job or any other reasons for wanting to keep your confidentiality, just let us know.

If you’re directly involved in the story yourself, such as in a kiss and tell article or exposing how a celebrity has hurt you or helped you, it’s a bit more important that you are are identified. However, that doesn’t mean you have to have all your personal information spilled in the press. There are always options for obscuring what you look like or not including where you live. It’s best to have a chat with us about your worries – be upfront about them, and we’ll work really hard to find a solution that works for you. After all, you’re our client and we want you to be happy.

For more information, have a look at our guide to selling an anonymous story to the press.

 

How much are celebrity stories worth?

There are so many factors that come into play when valuing a celebrity story – you’re better off having a chat with us about the gist of yours, and we’ll be able to figure out a price. For example, if a celebrity is particularly topical at that moment the story will be extra attractive to the editors. If you’ve got a story about a Big Brother contestant or a Strictly Come Dancing star you’ll profit from striking while they’re in the public eye. Also, the more proof you’ve got to back up your story the better. This could include a series of clear photographs, text messages, documents, or voice recordings. Finally, the shock factor of your story will affect its value. Is your story revealing something about a celebrity that will surprise us?

Working with SellMyStory.co.uk is the best way to get the top price for your story. We know exactly which showbiz reporters to negotiate with, and how to pitch your exclusive to ensure a big fee.

There are more details in our newspaper story price guide.

 

Can I get in legal trouble for selling a story about a celebrity?

With our expert guidance, you can be sure that your story will be legally absolutely watertight before it goes anywhere near a newspaper’s printers. We don’t want you to get into any trouble, and we’ll make sure you don’t. This is why it’s always best not to splash your scoop around on social media first – you never know who might be looking. Wait until the lawyers have been through the story with a fine tooth comb, so by the time it’s published you can feel confident about sharing it online to your heart’s content!

 

Contact us confidentially for a chat about your options – our team of media consultants is ready to help. Give us a call on 0117 9076934 or fill in the form on the right and we’ll get in touch.

By Helen O’Brien Google